Do you ever follow someone and they follow you and you really wanna be friends with them but you feel like you’re bothering them everytime you try to interact with them but they’re just so cool and you’re just like

image

shy people problems

(via coraleethroughthelookingglass)

In 2009, researchers at the University of Southern California carried out a comprehensive study of the 150 biggest video game releases – they discovered that less than 10% of game characters are female. Acknowledging the existence of women and reflecting that in video games is not positive discrimination. People are not asking for every single game to star a female protagonist; they are asking for more than literally one or two titles a year to star a female protagonist. They’re asking for it to be an option. In no way is it tokenism to politely request that games more accurately reflect the makeup of the game-playing public and indeed society, instead of existing in a strange alternate reality where 90% of noteworthy people are white and male and have a number two buzzcut. Video games need more women – and asking for that won’t end the world | Technology | theguardian.com (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

thinkmexican:

Farewell, Gabo
Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez died at his Mexico City home on Thursday. He was 87.
García Márquez lived the majority of his adult life in Mexico after first moving there in 1961 while in political exile. It is said that he received the inspiration for his masterpiece, “100 Years of Solitude,” while driving to Acapulco in 1965.
Gabo, as he was affectionately known, lived a storied life, making friends with everyone from Fidel Castro to Bill Clinton. It was, in fact, his relationship with Castro that had him banned from entering the United States for more than thirty years.
Gabriel García Márquez’s remains were cremated in a private ceremony last night. A family spokesman said in a statement that an official memorial will be held at Mexico’s Palacio de Bellas Artes on April 21.

thinkmexican:

Farewell, Gabo

Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez died at his Mexico City home on Thursday. He was 87.

García Márquez lived the majority of his adult life in Mexico after first moving there in 1961 while in political exile. It is said that he received the inspiration for his masterpiece, “100 Years of Solitude,” while driving to Acapulco in 1965.

Gabo, as he was affectionately known, lived a storied life, making friends with everyone from Fidel Castro to Bill Clinton. It was, in fact, his relationship with Castro that had him banned from entering the United States for more than thirty years.

Gabriel García Márquez’s remains were cremated in a private ceremony last night. A family spokesman said in a statement that an official memorial will be held at Mexico’s Palacio de Bellas Artes on April 21.

(via angrylatinxsunited)

Game of Thrones: The Purple Wedding

cryinodonoghue:

…i guess u could say someone killed the life of the party………………

(dedicated to sansaspark)

image

image

image

Read More

thinkmexican:

The Oscar Is Mexican: Academy Award Statuette Modeled After Emilio ‘El Indio’ Fernández
The story behind the Academy Award’s Oscar statuette is itself one fit for the movies.
It starts in the 1920s during the Mexican Revolution. Emilio Fernández was studying in Mexico’s military college when he dropped out to take up arms and support the revolutionary cause of Adolfo de la Huerta.
Forced into exile, a defeated De la Huerta left Mexico in 1924 to open a music school in Hollywood. A less lucky Fernández was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison. However, he was only in jail for 8 months when he managed to escape. It is said he used dynamite to blow himself out of jail. He soon joined back up with De la Huerta in Los Angeles where he began working as an extra in Hollywood films. It was in 1928 that friend and fellow Mexican Dolores del Río approached Fernández with the proposition of being the nude model for the Academy Award.
Reluctant at first, Fernández took the job and is now forever tied to the Academy Award and its statuette, the “Oscar.”
Fernández eventually returned to Mexico where he wrote, directed and starred in dozens of films, receiving critical acclaim for several of them.
In 1946, his masterpiece, “María Candelaria,” was the first Mexican film to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival of France. It won the Grand Prix prize for best feature film. And in 2002, the U.S. Library of Congress named “La Perla,” which he co-wrote and directed with John Steinbeck, to its National Film Registry.
In Mexico, Emilio Fernández was known as “El Indio,” Spanish for “The Indian,” a tribute to his Indigenous heritage and subject of many of his films.
Fernández’s place in Mexican cinema is well known and highly regarded, but his role in American film history as both an actor and muse for the ultimate Hollywood award has been largely forgotten.
As you watch the Academy Awards ceremony Sunday night, remember the story of how a young man in Mexico went from fighting in a revolution to being the model for the “Oscar.” To El Indio Fernández!
This an updated version of a post we first published February 26, 2012.

thinkmexican:

The Oscar Is Mexican: Academy Award Statuette Modeled After Emilio ‘El Indio’ Fernández

The story behind the Academy Award’s Oscar statuette is itself one fit for the movies.

It starts in the 1920s during the Mexican Revolution. Emilio Fernández was studying in Mexico’s military college when he dropped out to take up arms and support the revolutionary cause of Adolfo de la Huerta.

Forced into exile, a defeated De la Huerta left Mexico in 1924 to open a music school in Hollywood. A less lucky Fernández was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison. However, he was only in jail for 8 months when he managed to escape. It is said he used dynamite to blow himself out of jail. He soon joined back up with De la Huerta in Los Angeles where he began working as an extra in Hollywood films.
It was in 1928 that friend and fellow Mexican Dolores del Río approached Fernández with the proposition of being the nude model for the Academy Award.

Reluctant at first, Fernández took the job and is now forever tied to the Academy Award and its statuette, the “Oscar.”

Fernández eventually returned to Mexico where he wrote, directed and starred in dozens of films, receiving critical acclaim for several of them.

In 1946, his masterpiece, “María Candelaria,” was the first Mexican film to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival of France. It won the Grand Prix prize for best feature film. And in 2002, the U.S. Library of Congress named “La Perla,” which he co-wrote and directed with John Steinbeck, to its National Film Registry.

In Mexico, Emilio Fernández was known as “El Indio,” Spanish for “The Indian,” a tribute to his Indigenous heritage and subject of many of his films.

Fernández’s place in Mexican cinema is well known and highly regarded, but his role in American film history as both an actor and muse for the ultimate Hollywood award has been largely forgotten.

As you watch the Academy Awards ceremony Sunday night, remember the story of how a young man in Mexico went from fighting in a revolution to being the model for the “Oscar.” To El Indio Fernández!

This an updated version of a post we first published February 26, 2012.

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

sansaofhousestark:

i’m actually amazed i haven’t heard more people talking about the moment sansa assists tyrion in this ep. sansa choosing to assist tyrion is a Huge Deal considering the situation - joffrey is publically humiliating him, making a big, ugly display of his power. and simply by handing tyrion the cup sansa is openly displaying her hostility towards joffrey, and her giving voice to everyone’s disapproval. not to mention, it’s a perfect example of ‘courtesy is a lady’s armour’ - that kindness, acting doubly as an insult, as a statement. she chooses to side with the person joffrey is humiliating. she takes away some of his power just by being kind.

and can we talk about this moment?

image

image

this is the person who tormented her for months. the person who could easily punish her over and over for any small transgression against him.

and she looks him in the eye, bends down and picks up that cup, and makes no mistake in showing him she knows exactly what she’s doing and she doesn’t approve of his actions.

(via brienne-the-blue)

elfogadunk:

Brienne isn’t as excited about lingerie as Jaime is.

elfogadunk:

Brienne isn’t as excited about lingerie as Jaime is.

Cunt again? It was odd how men…used that word to demean women when it was the only part of a woman they valued. — Asha Greyjoy, A Dance with Dragons (via something-resembling-gumption)

(via yellowdelaney)