HBO: What was it like to film the combat scene? Can you explain Oberyn’s decisions?

Pedro Pascal: It was very challenging because there was a physical aspect of it – which was the most demanding work that I’ve ever done – but also Oberyn is climaxing emotionally. Those two things synchronize themselves really beautifully.

I had a fascinating conversation with Lena Headey on set where we discussed the entire arc of the character. Oberyn is desperate to hear the Mountain make his confession. Although it’s a violently tragic end, he does ultimately hear the words. There is this bittersweet ecstasy in the idea of delivering oneself to one’s own end. It’s a very cathartic moment.

HBO: In a previous episode, Oberyn is writing a poem for his daughter. Have you thought through his life in Dorne?

Pedro Pascal: I see him as an extremely contemporary, progressive and loving father. I think it’s so suitable that he had nothing but daughters to raise. He doesn’t shape ideas based on old conventions so his daughters are not limited by backwards, medieval morality.

HBO: He’s very emotionally intelligent.

Pedro Pascal: I think there’s a depth in the way that Oberyn perceives the world and the way he lives in it. I think there’s a lot of woman inside of Oberyn, which attributes to his strength.

HBO: Can you explain what you mean by “a lot of woman”?

Pedro Pascal: Perceptiveness. Intelligence. In the world of ‘Game of Thrones,’ which can harshly reflect some of the darker elements of our reality, I would argue that women are often forced to be smarter and more in touch with themselves because their circumstances are so ruled by men. Women’s survival skills kick in a bit earlier.

HBO: Would you say that Oberyn is a feminist?

Pedro Pascal: Absolutely. Without choosing to be. It’s just intrinsic and logical to him. Ellaria Sand is the love of his life because she is his equal, if not his superior, in certain ways. That’s part of what makes him such a fierce man because he knows who to take his lead from.

HBO: How do you hope that fans remember Oberyn?

Pedro Pascal: As a lover and a fighter. As a fun character who ushered in something new to King’s Landing and stirred some sh*t up: Big in, big out.

HBO: Fans are bound to be brokenhearted.

Pedro Pascal: As am I. As I have been all along.

Source: (x)

I’d be the first to admit that I didn’t give two shits about Oberyn in the books, and I was actually a little baffled by all the hype about him at the start of the season. But Pedro Pascal did a fenomenal job with this role, and by the time The Mountain and the Viper aired I had become so emotionally invested in his character, I was actually shocked and heartbroken, despite knowing from the begining how he would end up.

It’s rare to see something done so much better in the show than in the books, and the credit for making Oberyn such a compelling character (and such a pleasure to watch, might I add) goes all to Mr Pascal. It’s obvious that he took a lot of time to reflect on Oberyn’s feelings, and delving into his past, his relationships and the things that motivate him helped him create a character that was incredibly human and believable. It’s amazing how half of the acting seems to be done off-screen.

(via mnemosyne95)

angryasiangirlsunited:

The actresses from our show did a segment on their casting experiences in Hollywood. It’s eye opening and I’m hoping people see the need to donate to this project if they haven’t already!

MisSpelled is about five girls who mysteriously acquire magical powers and how they learn to deal with them and one another. It’s a dramedy and mostly just a fantastical adventure featuring an all women of color cast and a variety of body types.

So often we clamor for diversity and when shows like MisSpelled pop up they fall by the wayside because they don’t have the financial backing of a network. 

We are gearing into our kickstarter phase and need support from you! Please check out our Kickstarter and awesome perks!

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megamiblues:

Bi-Weapon

megamiblues:

Bi-Weapon

clamp-hitsuzen:

xxxHOLiC Rei - Chapter Covers Vol.1

annalandin:

The Maiden Fair. Brienne of Tarth. (book-based, not tv-series-based). Even though I am a huge, nerdy fan of ASOIAF, I rarely draw fanart of it, because how on earth am I going to do the story justice and argh. But here, at last, Brienne. Because I love her and everything she stands for and oh sweet god let’s hope the tv-series stops mucking up the book-canon and messing around with her because she’s got such beautifully tragic things to do and 
Erm. Yes. Brienne. Maybe one day I’ll pluck up the courage to draw Davos. Or Dolorous Edd. Or Sansa.

annalandin:

The Maiden Fair. Brienne of Tarth.

(book-based, not tv-series-based).

Even though I am a huge, nerdy fan of ASOIAF, I rarely draw fanart of it, because how on earth am I going to do the story justice and argh.

But here, at last, Brienne. Because I love her and everything she stands for and oh sweet god let’s hope the tv-series stops mucking up the book-canon and messing around with her because she’s got such beautifully tragic things to do and

Erm. Yes. Brienne. Maybe one day I’ll pluck up the courage to draw Davos. Or Dolorous Edd. Or Sansa.

(via eonbluenegative)

theuppitynegras:

highfashionandmakeup:

Lupita Nyong’o for Vogue US  July 2014

LOOK AT THE GLORY

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baileysprize:

Actress Gwendoline Christie’s warrior alter-ego captures the castle

“I Capture the Castle, by Dodie Smith made me realise that there’s nothing wrong with having a slightly eccentric nature.”

Photograph by Alice Hawkins.
Articles written from interviews by Sophie Robinson, edited by Natalie Smith.
Raised in the countryside, witty, attracted to the unconventional:  actress Gwendoline Christie is describing Cassandra, the narrator of I Capture the Castle but could almost be describing herself.
We’re filming in a gritty Hoxton warehouse, a far cry from the landscape of Game of Thrones.
“I feel a connection to Cassandra. Cassandra wants to be a writer. She wants to take a different path and that resonated with me.”
“This book is the story of a young girl, Cassandra Mortmain, whose family lives in a dilapidated castle, in a state of genteel poverty. She’s negotiating life, moving from a child into an adult.”
Christie deftly summarises the novel, written by Dodie Smith in the interwar period. Smith, a conscientious objector, had left England to live in Malibu, California and her yearning for a bohemian, romantic England is palpable on each page.
“It’s about the Mortmain family. The father is a writer who’s achieved great success with his novel Jacob’s Wrestling, which is an avant-garde experimental novel. It achieved global success including…in America. It’s loosely set in the ‘30s and the main character is a young girl called Cassandra. She is making the transition from child to adult.”
“She has a step-mother called Topaz, who’s a retired artist’s model with a penchant for naturism; an older sister called Rose, who’s a classic beauty and the hope for the family then, that she may marry someone with some money, as was one of the few options for women then. There’s a younger brother called Thomas. There’s a lodger called Stephen who becomes a movie star.”

“It’s just sprawling, eccentric and quite bats, a family trying to negotiate staying alive.”

Christie read the book twice as a teenager, seeing something of a kindred spirit in Cassandra. She revisited it a year ago, searching for something a little lighter after a stint of ‘gritty reads’. 
“It’s strangely illuminating about life. It’s full of very witty ruminations on the dynamics we experience in every day life and feels relevant, even though it’s a bohemian, 1930s family. Cassandra’s insights into the world around her are very perceptive.”
The story of Dodie Smith’s exhaustive writing process is another draw for Christie as well as an inspiration. 
“Smith made an enormous amount of effort with this book. She did all the drawings inside the book. She rewrote every single sentence, at least two or three times in order to make it seem effortless and seamless. I believe that she even created models of the house so that she was able to follow through the story and see if it really lived and worked. That rigor and determination and artistic discipline, I deeply admire,” explains Christie, who is well known for a similar discipline and commitment to her craft as an actress.
“I think also, possibly, from reading this book, we’re both more interested in the colourful, exotic, flamboyant and eccentric elements of life.”
“This book made me realise that there’s nothing wrong with, perhaps, having a slightly eccentric nature and that these characters are actually what makes life exciting.”

Gwendoline Christie is an actress best known for her role as warrior Brienne of Tarth in Game of Thrones. She chose Dodie Smith’s much loved coming of age tale, I Capture the Castle. Smith also wrote the classic 101 Dalmatians. 
Discover more #THISBOOK selections from our 19 incredible women here. Join the conversation and share your #THISBOOK on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook.

baileysprize:

Actress Gwendoline Christie’s warrior alter-ego captures the castle

I Capture the Castle, by Dodie Smith made me realise that there’s nothing wrong with having a slightly eccentric nature.”

  • Photograph by Alice Hawkins.
  • Articles written from interviews by Sophie Robinson, edited by Natalie Smith.

Raised in the countryside, witty, attracted to the unconventional:  actress Gwendoline Christie is describing Cassandra, the narrator of I Capture the Castle but could almost be describing herself.

We’re filming in a gritty Hoxton warehouse, a far cry from the landscape of Game of Thrones.

“I feel a connection to Cassandra. Cassandra wants to be a writer. She wants to take a different path and that resonated with me.”

“This book is the story of a young girl, Cassandra Mortmain, whose family lives in a dilapidated castle, in a state of genteel poverty. She’s negotiating life, moving from a child into an adult.”

Christie deftly summarises the novel, written by Dodie Smith in the interwar period. Smith, a conscientious objector, had left England to live in Malibu, California and her yearning for a bohemian, romantic England is palpable on each page.

“It’s about the Mortmain family. The father is a writer who’s achieved great success with his novel Jacob’s Wrestling, which is an avant-garde experimental novel. It achieved global success including…in America. It’s loosely set in the ‘30s and the main character is a young girl called Cassandra. She is making the transition from child to adult.”

“She has a step-mother called Topaz, who’s a retired artist’s model with a penchant for naturism; an older sister called Rose, who’s a classic beauty and the hope for the family then, that she may marry someone with some money, as was one of the few options for women then. There’s a younger brother called Thomas. There’s a lodger called Stephen who becomes a movie star.”

“It’s just sprawling, eccentric and quite bats, a family trying to negotiate staying alive.”

Christie read the book twice as a teenager, seeing something of a kindred spirit in Cassandra. She revisited it a year ago, searching for something a little lighter after a stint of ‘gritty reads’. 

“It’s strangely illuminating about life. It’s full of very witty ruminations on the dynamics we experience in every day life and feels relevant, even though it’s a bohemian, 1930s family. Cassandra’s insights into the world around her are very perceptive.”

The story of Dodie Smith’s exhaustive writing process is another draw for Christie as well as an inspiration. 

“Smith made an enormous amount of effort with this book. She did all the drawings inside the book. She rewrote every single sentence, at least two or three times in order to make it seem effortless and seamless. I believe that she even created models of the house so that she was able to follow through the story and see if it really lived and worked. That rigor and determination and artistic discipline, I deeply admire,” explains Christie, who is well known for a similar discipline and commitment to her craft as an actress.

“I think also, possibly, from reading this book, we’re both more interested in the colourful, exotic, flamboyant and eccentric elements of life.”

“This book made me realise that there’s nothing wrong with, perhaps, having a slightly eccentric nature and that these characters are actually what makes life exciting.”


Gwendoline Christie is an actress best known for her role as warrior Brienne of Tarth in Game of Thrones. She chose Dodie Smith’s much loved coming of age tale, I Capture the Castle. Smith also wrote the classic 101 Dalmatians. 

Discover more #THISBOOK selections from our 19 incredible women here. Join the conversation and share your #THISBOOK on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook.

pentikular:

Margaery putting daisies in Brienne’s armor

Margaery insisting on a forehead kiss so Brienne has to bow

Margaery worrying about her lady knight when she’s away doing work for the kingdom

Margaery making Brienne laugh really loudly in court but she’s not even embarrassed

Margery and Brienne ~*